Frequently Asked Questions about Foreclosure

Q: If I don't file an answer, what will happen?

A: If the defendant does not file an answer, he or she is deemed to have admitted the claims in the foreclosure complaint. The Plaintiff's attorney can seek entry of default against the defendant and thereafter seek a final judgment of foreclosure.

Q: Should I answer even though my 35 days are up?

A: The SCCO cannot provide legal advice and will not advise a defendant to file an answer or not to file an answer. An attorney can evaluate a defendant's circumstances and help him determine whether it is in his best interest to file an answer after the 35 days are up. If a defendant wishes to file an answer, written consent may be obtained from the Plaintiff's attorney by way of a Stipulation Extending Time to Answer, or a Motion Extending Time to Answer may be filed with the Office of Foreclosure (if the final judgment package has not been filed) or with the General Equity judge (if the final judgment package has already been filed).

Q: If I don't get an extension of time to answer and am past the 35 days can I still file an answer? Would it have any bearing on the case?

A: See question #2 above.

Q: I've worked out a deal with the lender, do I still have to file an answer?

A: Working out a deal with the lender will not automatically stop the foreclosure proceeding. An attorney can evaluate a defendant's circumstances and help him determine whether it is in his best interest to file an answer.

Q: If it is not my property but I am named in the case do I still have to answer?

A: Numerous parties can be named in a foreclosure case who are not the borrower but who have a legal interest in the outcome of the foreclosure action, such as judgment creditors, tenants, or secondary mortgage lien holders. An attorney can evaluate this type of defendant's circumstances and help him determine whether it is in his best interest to file an answer. The SCCO cannot provide legal advice and will not advise a defendant to file an answer or not to file an answer.

Q: I am the tenant of a property that is being foreclosed upon, what do I have to do and what are my rights?

A: Legitimate residential tenants have the right to stay in the property even though the property is being foreclosed upon. Until ownership of the property changes or the tenant is otherwise informed by the court or mortgage holder, the tenant should continue to pay rent to the landlord. A tenant who wants to remain in the home can only be removed through a court process. The tenant may be protected by the New Jersey Anti-Eviction Act, which protects a tenant's right to remain in the property. Tenants may refer to Notice to Residential Tenants of Rights During Foreclosure.

Q: What happens after I file my answer?

A: Answers are reviewed to determine whether the answer is contesting or non-contesting. If the answer is determined to be contesting it is transferred to the General Equity judge in the county of venue (the county in which the foreclosed property is located). If the Defendant's answer is deemed non-contesting, the foreclosure action will continue, with the Plaintiff's attorney taking the steps necessary to seek a final foreclosure judgment.

Q: How long do I have after the Judge hears the contested case (answer)?

A: How long it will take for a judge to hear a contested case cannot be determined definitely. After a contested answer is filed and transferred to the General Equity judge, the Plaintiff's attorney will often file a motion for summary judgment or to strike the answer. The date that these matters are scheduled to be heard by the judge will depend on when the Plaintiff's attorney files the motion and how much notice all parties must be given before the matter is heard by the judge.

If the judge does not enter summary judgment in the Plaintiff's favor or strike the defendant's answer or if the Plaintiff's attorney does not file a motion, the judge will schedule a pre-trial conference. How long that will take is dependent on the judge's calendar. The defendant will receive notices alerting him of these matters which he should read and follow carefully.

If a judge grants a motion for summary judgment or motion to strike the answer, deeming the case non-contesting, the case will be transferred back to the Office of Foreclosure and the Plaintiff may proceed to seek a final judgment of foreclosure against the defendant.

Q: Why was a foreclosure case started but nothing else ever filed – not even a dismissal?

A: The SCCO cannot speculate as to why no other pleadings were filed by the Plaintiff or why a Plaintiff has not dismissed the case. The defendant may contact the Plaintiff's attorney to discuss their concerns regarding these matters. If a defendant feels he has special circumstances that might warrant the dismissal of the case, he should discuss this matter with an attorney who can help him evaluate his options.

Q: What types of motions are filed with the Office of Foreclosure and what types are filed with the county?

A: There are several types of motions that may be filed in relation to a foreclosure proceeding. Some motions should only be filed with the Office of Foreclosure, while others should only be filed with the General Equity judge in the county of venue (the county in which the foreclosed property is located). Certain motions may be filed either with the Office of Foreclosure or with the county General Equity judge, depending, in part, on whether or not a foreclosure final judgment package has been filed with the Office of Foreclosure.

Types of Motions filed with the Office of Foreclosure:

  • Motion for Entry of Final Judgment
  • Motion for Entry of Default Out of Time
  • Motion to Vacate Default (if the final judgment package has NOT yet been filed)
  • Motions Extending Time to Answer (if the final judgment package has NOT yet been filed)
  • Motion to file an Amended Complaint (when any answer—contesting or non-contesting—has been filed)
  • Motion for Surplus Funds (if payment of surplus funds is not contested and the party seeking the funds was a party to the original foreclosure case)

Examples of Motions filed with the county judges:

  • Motion Extending Time to Answer (if the final judgment package has already been filed)
  • Motion to Vacate Default (if the final judgment package has already been filed)
  • Motion for Summary Judgment
  • Motion Appointing Guardian Ad Litem
  • Motion Appointing Rent Receivers
  • Motion Appointing Attorney for Party in Military Service
  • Motion for Substituted Service
  • Motion to Set Aside Final Judgment or Summary Judgment
  • Motion to Stay Foreclosure Proceeding (There are various reasons to stay foreclosure proceedings; the defendant will need to contact an attorney to determine if this option is available to him.)
  • Motion to Stay Sheriff's Sale
  • Motion to Stay Eviction
  • Motion to Vacate Sheriff's Sale

Q: The types of correspondence a I receive from the mortgage company are not the same pleadings found in my foreclosure file.

A: The foreclosure file will contain only those documents which the court requires to be filed in a Foreclosure proceeding. Generally, the foreclosure file will not include correspondence the mortgage company has sent to the borrower about the defaulted loan, as the submittal of these documents are not required by the New Jersey Rules of Court.

Q: Can the SCCO confirm that the information found in my foreclosure file proves that an illegal practice has been done by the mortgage company?

A: The SCCO cannot provide legal advice or legal analysis of any kind. If a defendant has a question regarding the legality of the mortgage company's actions, he should consult a private attorney. An attorney would have the legal expertise necessary to identify whether or not illegal practices were conducted on the part of the mortgage company.

Q: Why have certain pleadings been filed in the foreclosure action and what bearing does the document have on the foreclosure case?

A: The following documents are most commonly filed in foreclosure actions:

Foreclosure Complaint. This document is filed by the lender (plaintiff), usually a bank or mortgage company, after the debtor-homeowner (defendant) defaults on his or her loan. The Foreclosure Complaint states the terms of the mortgage and the event of default and asks the court to allow the property to be sold to satisfy the debt. It is the first document filed by the lender which starts the legal Foreclosure process.

Answer. This document is filed by the defendant and provides a response to all of the allegations in the Complaint. The Answer gives notice to the court that the defendant opposes the relief requested in the Complaint.

Affidavit of Non-Military Service. This document is filed by the plaintiff and certifies as to whether or not the defendant(s) are in active military service. The purpose of this document is to protect the rights of those who may not be able to defend themselves in a foreclosure action because they are currently serving in the military.

Affidavit of Service/ Return of Service. This document is completed by the process server (the person who served the summons and complaint on the defendant) and provides proof to the court that the defendant was, in fact, properly served.

Affidavit of Inquiry. When a defendant is not personally served, this document must be submitted by the plaintiff's attorney, explaining why the defendant(s) had to be served by alternate means.

Request for Default. When a defendant fails to file an answer to the foreclosure complaint, the plaintiff will file this document with the court to notify it that the defendant(s) failed to answer. A Request for Default must be submitted for the court to formally note on its records that the defendant failed to defend against the claim. A plaintiff cannot seek a Final Judgment in Foreclosure unless the plaintiff first obtains an entry of default against the defendant(s).

Notice of Motion for Default and Order for Default. These documents serve the same purpose as the Request for Default, but are filed in place of the Request for Default when more than 6 months has passed since the defendant failed to file an answer. If the motion is granted an Order for Default will be entered by the court.

Notice of Mailing Default (Proof of Mailing). The plaintiff submits this document to notify the court that it has mailed a copy of the entered Request for Default or the Order for Default to the defendant, as required by the Court Rules.

Certification of Mailing Notice to Cure. This document is filed by the plaintiff in cases where the Fair Foreclosure Act applies. This document notifies the court that the plaintiff has mailed the appropriate notice to the defendant and provides the court with a copy of the mailed notice.

Mediation Certification. This document is submitted by the plaintiff to notify the court whether or not the plaintiff mailed a mediation packet to the defendant.

Notice of Motion for Final Judgment and Proof of Amount Due. This document is submitted to request that a Final Judgment of Foreclosure be entered by the court. It includes a breakdown of the amount owed by the defendant. If the defendant has a valid objection to the amount due as stated in the Affidavit attached to the Notice of Motion for Final Judgment, he must submit it to the court within 10 days of receiving the Motion.

Final Judgment. The Final Judgment of Foreclosure is an order from the court which includes the following: 1) amount due to the plaintiff, 2) orders payment to the plaintiff, 3) provides for the judicial sale of the mortgaged property, 4) bars the defendant's right to redeem the mortgage after default, and 5) if requested, awards possession of the mortgaged property to the plaintiff/purchaser.

Writ of Execution. This document is submitted with the Final Judgment document and is used to enforce the Final Judgment. The Writ of Execution authorizes the sheriff to sell the property in satisfaction of the Final Judgment of Foreclosure.

Q: If a pleading is returned for corrections, and copies of the pleading have already been sent to the other parties involved, do the corrected pleadings need to be re-served on the other parties?

A: The Return Notice completed by the Office of Foreclosure staff will usually specify whether or not a copy of the corrected document must be re-served on the other parties. When a pleading is returned by the SCCO staff, the Return Notice will not specify whether the document needs to be re-served, however, the SCCO recommends that documents returned for corrections be re-served.

Q: Will my case automatically be dismissed if I catch up on my arrears before the answer is due?

A: No. Catching up on arrears will not cause the foreclosure proceeding to be automatically dismissed. The Plaintiff's attorney must seek to have the case dismissed if the defendant has worked out a deal with the lender and caught up on any arrearages.

Q: Can a bankruptcy stop a foreclosure?

A: In most cases, filing for bankruptcy will trigger the automatic stay provisions of the Bankruptcy Code. The automatic stay prevents a party from starting or continuing a foreclosure proceeding; this means that all activity on the foreclosure case must stop. Filing for bankruptcy will not cause the foreclosure proceeding to be automatically dismissed. Once the bankruptcy case is resolved (closed, dismissed, or discharge granted or denied) or the bankruptcy stay is vacated, the foreclosure proceeding will pick up where it left off before the automatic stay took effect. The defendant should consult an attorney who can evaluate the defendant's circumstances and help him determine whether it is in his best interest to file for bankruptcy.

Q: How much time do I have to file a bankruptcy during a foreclosure process?

A: The defendant should consult an attorney who can evaluate the defendant's circumstances and help him determine whether it is in his best interest to file for bankruptcy and when such filing should be made.

Q: What happens after the request for default is filed?

A: Once a request for default is filed, it is reviewed by the SCCO staff to determine whether the request complies with the Court's requirements. If the request for default meets the Court's requirements, default is entered against the parties requested. A copy of the filed default is sent to the Plaintiff's attorney, who is then responsible for mailing a copy of the default to the defendants, notifying them that default has been entered against them.

An entry of default against a defendant simply means that the Court notes on its records that the defendant failed to defend against the claim by filing an answer with the Court. An entry of default is not a final foreclosure judgment, nor does it give the Plaintiff the right to take and sell the defendant's home. After entry of default is made, the Plaintiff's attorney is then allowed to seek a final judgment of foreclosure against the defendants.

Q: Can I stop a Final Judgment procedure?

A: The Plaintiff is the only party who may voluntarily stop a final judgment procedure. There are a limited number of circumstances under which a Final Judgment procedure may be stopped. If a defendant works out an agreement with the lender, the Plaintiff (lender) may dismiss the foreclosure proceeding. If a defendant is eligible for foreclosure mediation and a mediation settlement is reached, the settlement may include a provision that the Plaintiff will dismiss the foreclosure proceeding. If a defendant feels he has special circumstances that might warrant the dismissal of the final judgment procedure, he should discuss this matter with an attorney who can help him evaluate his options.

Q: After a Final Judgment has been filed, how much time do I have to file a motion objecting to the final judgment and is that the only way a foreclosure can be stopped?

A: According to the language provided in the Notice of Motion for Final Judgment, a defendant has 10 days to file an objection to the Affidavit of Amount Due attached to the Notice of Motion for Final Judgment. The Notice of Motion for Final Judgment provides direction on where to send the objection. If an objection is received, it will be reviewed by the Office of Foreclosure to determine whether a valid objection to the amount due, which is attached to the Notice of Motion for Final Judgment, has been raised. Filing an objection does not stop the foreclosure. If an objection to the amount due is valid, the case will be transferred to the vicinage judge, who will make a final determination on the matter. After the vicinage judge makes a decision on the objection, the case will be transferred back to the Office of Foreclosure to process the Final Judgment request.

Once a Final Judgment has been entered, the only way a defendant can object to it is by motion to the General Equity judge. A defendant should discuss with an attorney whether the defendant has valid circumstances which may warrant the reversal of a final judgment.

Q: Can a Final Judgment be reversed after it is filed?

A: A final judgment can be vacated voluntarily by the Plaintiff. Sometimes this occurs if a settlement has been reached between the lender and the mortgagor either privately or through the foreclosure mediation process. Otherwise a final judgment can only be reversed on motion to the General Equity judge. A defendant should discuss with an attorney whether the defendant has valid circumstances which may warrant the reversal of a final judgment.

Q: How long can I stay in my house after a final judgment is filed?

A: Unless the defendant has entered into an agreement with the lender stating otherwise, the defendant usually does not have to vacate the property until some time after the Sheriff's sale. The Sheriff must advertise the sale of the property for a minimum of four weeks before holding the sale. Once the Sheriff's sale is completed, the Plaintiff must seek a Writ of Possession from the court, which instructs the Sheriff to remove any occupants from the property. The defendant will be notified by the Sheriff of the date on which they must leave the property.

Preguntas comunes sobre las ejecuciones hipotecarias

P: Si no presento una contestación, ¿qué sucederá?

R: Si la parte demandada no presenta una contestación, se considerará que ha admitido las reclamaciones de la demanda de ejecución hipotecaria. El abogado de la parte demandante puede pedir que se anote un fallo en rebeldía contra la parte demandada y, a partir de ahí, pedir un fallo definitivo de ejecución hipotecaria.

P: ¿Debo contestar, aunque ya hayan pasado mis 35 días?

R: La Secretaría del Tribunal Superior (SCCO) no puede dar consejos legales y no aconsejará a un demandado sobre si debe presentar su contestación o no. Un abogado puede evaluar las circunstancias del demandado y ayudarle a determinar si contestar después de que hayan pasado los 35 días es lo mejor para la parte demandada. Si la parte demandada todavía desea presentar una contestación, puede obtener consentimiento por escrito del abogado de la parte demandante con una Estipulación para la Extensión del Tiempo de Contestación, o puede presentar un Pedimento de Extensión del Tiempo de Contestación en la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias (si todavía no se ha presentado el paquete del fallo definitivo) o ante el juez de Equidad General (si ya se presentó el paquete del fallo definitivo).

P: Si no me dan una extensión del tiempo para contestar y ya han pasado los 35 días, ¿todavía puedo presentar la contestación? ¿Tendría alguna relevancia en el caso?

R: Ver la pregunta #2 arriba.

P: He hecho un trato con el prestamista, ¿todavía tengo que presentar la contestación?

R: Hacer un trato con el prestamista no detendrá automáticamente el procedimiento de ejecución hipotecaria. Un abogado puede evaluar sus circunstancias como demandado y ayudarle a determinar si presentar su contestación es lo mejor para usted.

P: Si la propiedad no es mía, pero me han nombrado en el caso, ¿todavía tengo que presentar la contestación?

R: En un caso de ejecución hipotecaria se pueden nombrar a numerosas personas que no son prestatarios pero que tienen un interés legal en el resultado de la ejecución hipotecaria, tales como acreedores del fallo, inquilinos o titulares del gravamen en una segunda hipoteca. Un abogado puede evaluar este tipo de circunstancias del demandado y ayudarle a determinar si presentar su contestación es lo mejor para usted. La SCCO no puede dar consejos legales y no aconsejará a la parte demandada si debe presentar su contestación o no.

P: Soy un(a) inquilino(a) de una propiedad bajo ejecución hipotecaria, ¿qué tengo que hacer y cuáles son mis derechos?

R: Los inquilinos residenciales legítimos tienen derecho a permanecer en la propiedad, aunque la propiedad esté en una ejecución hipotecaria. Hasta que la propiedad cambie de dueño o el tribunal o titular de la hipoteca le informe de otro modo, el (la) inquilino(a) debe seguir pagándole el alquiler al dueño. Un(a) inquilino(a) que desee permanecer en el hogar solo puede ser desalojado(a) por medio de un proceso judicial. Es posible que el(la) inquilino(a) esté protegido(a) por la Ley contra Desalojos de Nueva Jersey que protege el derecho de un(a) inquilino(a) a permanecer en la propiedad. Los inquilinos pueden referirse al Aviso a los inquilinos residenciales sobre sus derechos durante una ejecución hipotecaria..

P: ¿Qué sucede después que presente mi contestación?

R: Las contestaciones se repasan para determinar si la contestación es con oposición o sin oposición. Si se determina que la contestación es con oposición, ésta se transferirá al juez de Equidad General en el condado de jurisdicción (el condado donde se encuentra la propiedad en ejecución hipotecaria). Si se determina que la contestación de la Parte Demandada es sin oposición, la acción de la ejecución hipotecaria continuará y el abogado de la Parte Demandante tomará las medidas necesarias para obtener el fallo definitivo de ejecución hipotecaria.

P: ¿Cuánto tiempo tengo después de que el Juez vea el caso con oposición (contestación)?

R: No se puede determinar de modo definitivo cuánto tiempo le tomará al juez ver un caso con oposición. Después de presentada y transferida la contestación con oposición al juez de Equidad General, el abogado de la Parte Demandante con frecuencia presentará un pedimento para un fallo sumario o para que se anule la contestación. La fecha que se fije para que el juez vea estos asuntos dependerá de cuándo el abogado del demandante presente el pedimento y cuánta notificación haya que darles a todas las partes antes de que el juez vea los asuntos.

Si el juez no anota un fallo sumario a favor de la Parte Demandante o anula la contestación de la parte demandada o si el abogado de la Parte Demandante no presenta un pedimento, el juez señalará una conferencia antes del juicio. Cuánto tardará depende de la lista de causas del juez. La parte demandada recibirá notificaciones en las que se le informará sobre estos asuntos, las cuales debe leer y observar con cuidado.

Si un juez otorga el pedimento para un fallo sumario, es decir, sin participación de un jurado, o el pedimento para anular la contestación, considerando que es un caso sin oposición, el caso se devolverá a la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias y la Parte Demandante puede seguir adelante tratando de obtener un fallo definitivo de ejecución hipotecaria contra la parte demandada.

P: ¿Por qué se inició un proceso de ejecución hipotecaria sin que nunca se hubiera presentado nada - ni siquiera una desestimación?

R: La SCCO no puede especular por qué la Parte Demandante no ha hecho otras presentaciones ni ha desestimado la causa. La parte demandada puede ponerse en contacto con el abogado de la Parte Demandante para hablar sobre sus preocupaciones respecto a este asunto. Si la parte demandada opina que hay circunstancias especiales que podrían justificar la desestimación del caso, debe hablar sobre este asunto con un abogado que pueda ayudar la parte a evaluar sus opciones.

P: ¿Qué tipos de pedimentos se presentan en la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias y qué tipos en el condado?

R: Hay varios tipos de pedimentos que se pueden presentar en relación con el procedimiento de una ejecución hipotecaria. Algunos pedimentos solo se deben presentar en la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias mientras que otros solo se deben presentar al juez de Equidad General en el condado de la jurisdicción (el condado en el que se ubica la propiedad bajo ejecución hipotecaria). Ciertos pedimentos se pueden presentar ya sea en la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias o ante el juez de Equidad General del condado, dependiendo en parte de si se ha presentado o no el paquete del fallo definitivo de la ejecución hipotecaria en la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias.

Tipos de pedimentos que se presentan en la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias:

  • Un pedimento para Registrar un Fallo Definitivo
  • Un pedimento para Registrar una Rebeldía Fuera de Plazo
  • Un pedimento para Revocar la Rebeldía (si el paquete del fallo definitivo NO ha sido presentado todavía)
  • Un pedimento para la Extensión del Tiempo de Contestación (si el paquete del fallo definitivo NO ha sido presentado todavía)
  • Un pedimento para presentar una Demanda Enmendada (cuando se ha presentado cualquier contestación, con o sin oposición)
  • Un pedimento de Fondos Excedentes (si el pago de fondos excedentes no tiene oposición y la parte que pide los fondos fue una parte del caso original de ejecución hipotecaria)

Ejemplos de pedimentos que se presentan ante los jueces del condado:

  • Un pedimento para la Extensión del Tiempo de Contestación (si el paquete del fallo definitivo ya ha sido presentado)
  • Un pedimento para Anular la Rebeldía (si el paquete del fallo definitivo ya ha sido presentado)
  • Un pedimento de un Fallo Sumario
  • Un pedimento para que se nombre un curador Ad Litem
  • Un pedimento para que se nombren Depositarios Judiciales del Alquiler
  • Un pedimento para que se le nombre un Abogado a la Parte en el Servicio Militar
  • Un pedimento para la Sustitución de Entrega
  • Un pedimento para Anular el Fallo Definitivo o el Fallo Sumario
  • Un pedimento para Suspender el Procedimiento de Ejecución Hipotecaria (Existen varias razones para suspender los procedimientos de ejecución hipotecaria; la parte demandada tendrá que ponerse en contacto con un abogado para determinar si puede ejercer esta opción.)
  • Un pedimento para Suspender la Venta Judicial realizada bajo el alguacil
  • Un pedimento para Suspender el Desalojo
  • Un pedimento para Anular la Venta realizada bajo el alguacil

P: Los tipos de correspondencia que recibo de la compañía hipotecaria no son los mismos alegatos que se encuentran en mi expediente de ejecución hipotecaria.

R: El expediente de ejecución hipotecaria contendrá solamente los documentos que el tribunal requiere que se presenten en un procedimiento de Ejecución Hipotecaria. Por lo general, el expediente de ejecución hipotecaria no incluirá la correspondencia que la compañía hipotecaria le haya enviado al prestatario sobre el préstamo impagado ya que el Reglamento Judicial de Nueva Jersey no requiere que se entreguen esos documentos.

P: ¿Puede la SCCO confirmar que la información contenida en mi expediente de ejecución hipotecaria prueba que la compañía hipotecaria ha llevado a cabo una práctica ilegal?

R: La SCCO no puede dar consejos legales ni hacer ningún tipo de análisis legal. Si una parte demandada tiene alguna duda sobre la legalidad de las acciones de la compañía hipotecaria, debe consultar a un abogado privado. Un abogado tendrá el conocimiento y la pericia legal necesaria para identificar si la compañía hipotecaria llevó a cabo prácticas ilegales o no.

P: ¿Por qué se han presentado ciertos alegatos en la acción de ejecución hipotecaria y qué relevancia tiene el documento en la causa de la ejecución hipotecaria?

R: En las acciones de ejecución hipotecaria, los documentos siguientes son los que se presentan con más frecuencia:

Demanda de Ejecución Hipotecaria. Este documento lo presenta el prestamista (parte demandante), por lo general un banco o compañía hipotecaria, después de que el deudor-propietario (parte demandada) haya dejado de pagar su préstamo. La Demanda de Ejecución Hipotecaria manifiesta las condiciones de la hipoteca y el incumplimiento y solicita al juez que permita la venta de la propiedad para liquidar la deuda. Es el primer documento que el prestamista presenta, el cual inicia el procedimiento legal de ejecución hipotecaria

Contestación. Este documento lo presenta la parte demandada y responde a todo lo que se alega en la Demanda. La Contestación notifica al tribunal que la parte demandada se opone a la reparación judicial solicitada en la Demanda.

Affidávit de Servicio No Militar. La parte demandante presenta este documento para certificar si la(s) parte(s) demandante(s) está(n) o no está(n) en el servicio militar activo. La finalidad de este documento es proteger los derechos de aquellos que quizás no se puedan defender en una acción de ejecución hipotecaria debido a que actualmente están sirviendo en las fuerzas armadas.

Affidávit de Entrega/Constancia de diligenciamiento. Este documento lo llena el agente notificador (la persona que entrega el emplazamiento y la demanda a la parte demandada) y proporciona al tribunal prueba de que, de hecho, la parte demandada fue correctamente notificada.

Affidávit de Indagación. Cuando las notificaciones no se le entregan personalmente a una parte demandada, el abogado de la parte demandante debe entregar este documento para explicar por qué hubo que notificar a la parte o partes demandadas de un modo alterno.

Solicitud de Rebeldía.Cuando una parte demandada no presenta una contestación a la demanda de ejecución hipotecaria, la parte demandante presentará este documento al tribunal para notificarle que no hubo contestación de la(s) parte(s) demandada(s). Se debe enviar al tribunal una Solicitud de Rebeldía para que se anote formalmente en el registro del tribunal que la(s) parte(s) demandada(s) no se defendió (defendieron) contra la demanda. Una parte demandante no puede tratar de conseguir un Fallo Definitivo de Ejecución Hipotecaria a menos que la parte demandante obtenga primero una anotación de rebeldía contra la(s) parte(s) demandada(s).

Notificación de un Pedimento de Rebeldía y Orden de Rebeldía. Estos documentos cumplen con el mismo propósito que la Solicitud de Rebeldía, pero se presentan en lugar de la Solicitud de Rebeldía cuando hayan pasado más de 6 meses desde que la parte demandada no envió una contestación. Si se otorga el pedimento, el tribunal registrará una Orden de Rebeldía.

Notificación de Envió de la Rebeldía por Correo (Prueba del Envío).. La parte demandante entrega este documento para notificar al tribunal que le ha enviado por correo a la parte demandada una copia de la Solicitud de Rebeldía anotada o de la Orden de Rebeldía, según lo requiere el Reglamento Judicial.

Certificación del Envió por Correo de la Notificación para Subsanar el Incumplimiento.. Este documento lo presenta la parte demandante en los casos en que corresponde la Ley de Ejecución Hipotecaria Justa (Fair Foreclosure Act). Este documento le notifica al tribunal que la parte demandante ha enviado la notificación apropiada a la parte demandada y le proporciona al tribunal una copia de la notificación enviada por correo.

Certificación de Mediación. Este documento lo entrega la parte demandante para notificarle al tribunal si la parte demandante envió por correo un paquete de mediación a la parte demandada, o si no lo ha hecho.

Notificación de un Pedimento de Fallo Definitivo y Prueba del Total Adeudado. Este documento se entrega para solicitar que el juez asiente en el registro un Fallo Definitivo de Ejecución Hipotecaria. Incluye el desglose de la cantidad que la parte demandada debe. Si la parte demandada tiene una objeción válida al total adeudado según lo indica el Affidávit adjunto a la Notificación del Pedimento de Fallo Definitivo, tiene que entregar la objeción al tribunal dentro de los 10 días siguientes después de haber recibido el Pedimento.

Fallo Definitivo. El Fallo Definitivo de una Ejecución Hipotecaria es una orden del juez que incluye lo siguiente: 1) el total adeudado a la parte demandante, 2) la orden de pago a la parte demandante, 3) la preparación para la venta judicial de la propiedad hipotecada, 4) el veto del derecho de la parte demandada de rescatar la hipoteca después de la rebeldía y 5) la adjudicación, si se solicita, de la posesión de la propiedad hipotecada a la parte demandante/compradora.

Auto de Ejecución. Este documento se entrega con el documento del Fallo Definitivo y se utiliza para hacer cumplir el Fallo Definitivo. El Auto de Ejecución autoriza al alguacil para que venda la propiedad en cumplimiento del Fallo Definitivo de Ejecución Hipotecaria.

P: Si se devuelve un alegato para que se le hagan correcciones y ya se han enviado las copias del alegato a las otras partes, ¿hay que entregarles de nuevo los alegatos corregidos a las otras partes?

R: El Aviso de Devolución llenado por el personal de la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias usualmente especificará si hay que volver a entregar, o no, a las otras partes una copia del documento corregido. Cuando el personal de la SCCO devuelve un alegato, el Aviso de Devolución no especificará si es necesario entregar el documento de nuevo. Sin embargo, la SCCO recomienda que los documentos devueltos para que se les hagan correcciones se notifiquen una vez hechas las correcciones.

P: ¿Se desestimará mi caso automáticamente si me pongo al día con los atrasos antes de la fecha de entrega de la contestación?

R: No. Ponerse al día con los atrasos no causará que el procedimiento de ejecución hipotecaria sea desestimado automáticamente. El abogado de la Parte Demandante tiene que solicitar que se desestime el caso si la parte demandada ha llegado a un trato con el prestamista y se ha puesto al día con los atrasos

P: ¿Puede una bancarrota detener la ejecución hipotecaria?

R: En la mayoría de los casos, presentar una bancarrota desencadenará las disposiciones de suspensión automática del Código de Bancarrota. La suspensión automática evita que una parte inicie o continúe un procedimiento de ejecución hipotecaria; esto quiere decir que se debe detener toda la actividad en el caso de ejecución hipotecaria. La presentación de una solicitud de bancarrota no causará que se desestime automáticamente el procedimiento de ejecución hipotecaria. Una vez resuelto el caso de bancarrota (cerrado, desestimado o la rehabilitación se haya otorgado o denegado) o la suspensión de la bancarrota se anule, el procedimiento de ejecución hipotecaria se reanudará en el punto en que se detuvo antes de que la suspensión automática tuviera efecto. La parte demandada debe consultar con un abogado que pueda evaluar sus circunstancias y ayudarla a determinar si presentar la solicitud de bancarrota es lo mejor para la parte demandada.

P: ¿Cuánto tiempo tengo para presentar la solicitud de bancarrota durante un proceso de ejecución hipotecaria?

R: La parte demandada debe consultar con un abogado que pueda evaluar sus circunstancias y ayudarla a determinar si presentar la solicitud de bancarrota es lo mejor para la parte demandada y, cuándo se debe presentar tal solicitud.

P: ¿Qué sucede después de que se presente la solicitud de rebeldía?

R: Una vez que se presente una solicitud de rebeldía, el personal de la SCCO la repasa para determinar si la solicitud cumple con los requisitos judiciales. Si la solicitud de rebeldía cumple con los requisitos judiciales, se registra la rebeldía en contra de las partes solicitadas. Se envía una copia de la rebeldía registrada al abogado de la Parte Demandante que entonces es el responsable de enviar por correo una copia de la rebeldía a las partes demandadas para notificarles que la misma ha sido anotada en su contra.

La anotación de rebeldía contra una parte demandada significa sencillamente que el Tribunal ha asentado en sus registros que la parte demandada no se defendió contra la demanda presentando una contestación ante el Tribunal. Una anotación de rebeldía no es un fallo definitivo de ejecución hipotecaria y no le da a la Parte Demandante derecho a apropiarse del hogar de la parte demandada y venderlo. Después de que se anote la rebeldía, se le permite al abogado de la Parte Demandante pedir un fallo definitivo de ejecución hipotecaria contra las partes demandadas.

P: ¿Puedo detener el procedimiento del Fallo Definitivo?

R: La Parte Demandante es la única parte que puede detener voluntariamente un procedimiento de fallo definitivo de ejecución hipotecaria. Hay un número limitado de circunstancias bajo las cuales se puede detener un procedimiento de Fallo Definitivo. Si la parte demandada llega a un acuerdo con el prestamista, la Parte Demandante (el prestamista) puede desestimar el procedimiento de ejecución hipotecaria. Si la parte demandada reúne las condiciones para una mediación en la ejecución hipotecaria y se llega a un acuerdo en la mediación, el acuerdo puede incluir la disposición de que la Parte Demandante desestimará el procedimiento de ejecución hipotecaria. Si una parte demandada cree que hay circunstancias especiales que podrían justificar la desestimación del procedimiento del fallo definitivo, debe hablar sobre este asunto con un abogado que pueda ayudar a la parte a evaluar sus opciones

P: Después de que se haya presentado un Fallo Definitivo, ¿cuánto tiempo tengo para presentar un pedimento con mi objeción al fallo definitivo? ¿Es ese el único modo en que se puede detener una ejecución hipotecaria?

R: Según dispone la redacción de la Notificación de un Pedimento de Fallo Definitivo, la parte demandada tiene 10 días para presentar una objeción al Affidávit de Total Adeudado adjunto a la Notificación del Pedimento de Fallo Definitivo. La Notificación del Pedimento de Fallo Definitivo indica dónde enviar la objeción Si se recibe una objeción, la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias la repasará para determinar si se ha elevado una objeción válida al total adeudado, la cual va adjunta a la Notificación del Pedimento de Fallo Definitivo. La presentación de una objeción no detiene la ejecución hipotecaria. Si la objeción al total adeudado es válida, el caso será transferido al juez del vecindario que tomará la determinación final en el asunto. Después de que el juez del vecindario tome una decisión sobre la objeción, el caso se volverá a transferir a la Oficina de Ejecuciones Hipotecarias para procesar la solicitud del Fallo Definitivo.

Una vez registrado el Fallo Definitivo, la única manera en que la parte demandada puede objetar es con un pedimento al juez de Equidad General. La parte demandada debe hablar con un abogado para considerar si la parte demandada tiene circunstancias válidas que puedan justificar que se revoque el fallo definitivo.

P: ¿Se puede revocar el Fallo Definitivo después de que se haya registrado?

R: Un fallo definitivo puede ser voluntariamente anulado por la Parte Demandante. A veces esto sucede si se ha llegado a un acuerdo entre el prestamista y el deudor hipotecario, ya sea en privado o por medio del proceso de mediación en ejecuciones hipotecarias. Aparte de esto, el fallo definitivo solo se puede revocar con un pedimento al juez de Equidad General. La parte demandada debe hablar con un abogado para considerar si la parte demandada cuenta con circunstancias válidas que puedan justificar la revocación del fallo definitivo.

P:¿Cuánto tiempo me puedo quedar en mi casa después de registrado el fallo definitivo?

R: A menos que la parte demandada haya celebrado un acuerdo con el prestamista que lo exprese de otro modo, usualmente la parte demandada no tiene que desalojar la propiedad hasta un momento posterior a la venta del alguacil. El Alguacil tiene que anunciar la venta de la propiedad durante un mínimo de cuatro semanas antes de llevar a cabo la venta. Una vez terminada la venta judicial, la Parte Demandante tiene que pedirle al tribunal un Auto de Posesión que instruya al Alguacil que desaloje a todos los ocupantes de la propiedad. El Alguacil notificará a la parte demandada la fecha en que deben desalojar la propiedad.