ADA Title I Jobs

The Judiciary ensures that its courts, programs, services, and activities are accessible to all members of the community and prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities.

Accommodation requests for employees and job applicants with disabilities

Local Title I ADA coordinator directory for employees and job applicants

Call the local contact number to request an accommodation.

The ADA protects court employees and job applicants with disabilities.

The New Jersey Courts will not discriminate against employees or job applicants with disabilities regarding the terms, privileges or conditions of employment. The New Jersey Courts will not discharge an employee because of a disability, provided the employee remains qualified and able to perform the essential functions of the job with or without reasonable accommodations. Those protections also apply to court employees and job applicants who have a history of having a disability or who are regarded as having a disability.

The New Jersey Courts will provide a reasonable accommodation for your disability.

Reasonable accommodations will be provided to employees and job applicants, provided that the accommodation does not fundamentally alter the nature of a Judiciary program, service, or activity. The accommodation cannot impose undue hardship on the Judiciary, and the individual must be able to perform the essential functions of the job.

For more information, read our brochure on the New Jersey Judiciary’s Title I ADA Procedures for Employees and Job Applicants with Disabilities.

There are many ways the New Jersey Courts can accommodate your request.

Examples of accommodations for employees include:

  • Making facilities readily accessible to and usable by a person with a disability
  • Obtaining or modifying equipment or devices
  • Providing training materials in accessible formats
  • Restructuring a job by allocating or redistributing marginal job functions
  • Altering when or how an essential job function is performed
  • Providing modified work schedules
  • Reassigning an employee to a vacant equivalent position for which the employee is able to perform the essential function

Examples of accommodations for job applicants include:

  • Providing written materials in accessible formats, such as large print, Braille or audiotape
  • Providing readers or sign language interpreters
  • Holding recruitment, interviews, tests and other components of the application process in accessible locations and formats
  • Providing or modifying equipment or devices
  • Adjusting application procedures

How to request an accommodation

Accommodations are requested by the person with the disability. The employee or job applicant with a disability should tell the local Title I ADA coordinator that some type of assistance is needed to perform essential job functions or to participate in all aspects of the job interview and hiring process due to a medical condition. The request does not have to be in writing and no specific words need to be used.

Find a local Title I ADA coordinator.

Documentation might be requested.

You might be asked for specific medical documentation about the nature of your medical condition and how that disability limits your performance of the job. The information you submit will be kept confidential.

Information about your limitations might be shared with your supervisor or potential supervisor.

The local ADA coordinator will not share information about your medical condition with your manager or supervisor. The coordinator might share your limitations, as needed, to determine a reasonable accommodation. Medical notes should not be provided to the supervisor. They should be given directly to the Title I ADA coordinator.

Job applicants should contact the Title I ADA coordinator as early as possible.

As soon as you realize that you will need an accommodation for some aspect of the hiring process, you should contact the local Title I ADA coordinator. The coordinator will need enough time to provide certain accommodations. The coordinator might ask for more information or documentation in order to understand how an accommodation would enable you to participate fully in all aspects of the job interview and hiring process.

You have the right to appeal if you think the court has not resolved your issue.

  • If your request for accommodation was denied, but you have some new or additional information to submit, contact the local Title I ADA coordinator.
  • If your request was denied, but you have no new or additional information to submit, you can appeal the denial for accommodation to: 

    Assistant Director of Human Resources
    Administrative Office of the Courts
    [building_title]
    P.O. Box [pobox]

    [building_address]

    or appeal by calling phone_number]

You can file a complaint if you believe the New Jersey Courts have discriminated against you because of a disability.

  • You can file an internal EEO/AA complaint with the local EEO/AA officer in the county courthouse.
  • You can file a complaint with the chief EEO/AA officer at: 

    Administrative Office of the Courts
    [building_title]
    P.O. Box [pobox]
    [building_address]


    or file by calling [phone_number]
     
  • You also can choose to file a complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or with the New Jersey Division on Civil Rights.

Retaliation against anyone who complains about discrimination, files a discrimination complaint, or assists in the investigation of such complaints in prohibited. If you think the New Jersey Courts have retaliated against you, can file a complaint with the local EEO/AA officer at the county level or the Judiciary’s Chief EEO/AA officer at the central office.